Bizen Keshiki

Bizen Keshiki, or in English view/landscape, refers to the different effects that form on the surface of Bizen ceramics during the firing in the kiln. Below is a list of some of the most common Keshiki to look out for. You can see many of these on the Bizen-Yaki that we offer in our Bizen Ware categories.

Aobizen

Ao means blue. A beautiful, yet subtle shade of blue dons the surface of the ceramics.

Botamochi

The shape and color look similar to the Japanese rice cake called botamochi, hence the naming.

Goma

Looks like a sprinkling of sesame seeds on the surface of the ceramics. Sesame seeds are known as goma in Japanese, hence the naming.

Hidasuki

Eye catching red scorch markings created during firing due to the clay being wrapped in straw.

Hi-iro

Meaning is "flame color". Colors such as striking bright red or reddish-brown coat areas of the ceramics.

Kasegoma

A very desirable keshiki. The clay takes on a "crusty" texture. Usually a gray/silvery color.

Sangiri

Quite a varying array of colors, textures, and patches over the surface of the clay caused in the kiln during firing. One of the major keshiki and one that can give a Bizen piece an absolutely fantastic view/landscape.

Shiso-iro

a beautiful purple tone that resembles the leaf color of the perilla plant known as Shiso in Japanese. Iro simply means color.

Kinsai

Kin means gold in Japanese. Basically the surface of the clay takes on a gold color. Naturally a very sort after Keshiki!

Ishihaze

Small cracks that form around tiny stones that are used in the clay to create a desirable rough finish. The cracks are caused during drying and firing when the clay starts to shrink. The tiny stones don't shrink, so sometimes they cause the clay to crack open around them. This is regularly seen as a flaw in the western world, but is truly seen as aesthetic in Japan, and is dearly loved and prized for adding natural beauty to ceramics!